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Last updated on Friday, October 10, 2014, 8:57 am

Attorney Travis Story is a co-founder of Repeal 119, a Ballot Question Committee formed after the Fayetteville City Council passed a civil rights ordinance that protects, among other things, socioeconomic background, gender identity, gender expression and sexual orientation from discrimination in housing, employment and public accomodations. Story and those he represents say the ordinance is poorly written and unnecessary.

Fayetteville Readies for Vote on Non-Discrimination Ordinance

The civil rights ordinance that has Fayetteville on fire goes up for citywide vote on Dec. 9 and, until that time, the ordinance, a beacon of hope for some and a source of handwringing for others, promises to stir the heart of the region’s largest and most progressive city. Approved Aug. 20, at the end of a marathon public meeting, those in opposition to the law rallied and, by Sept. 20, had enough valid signatures, over 4,300 of them, to force a ballot question.  At the molten center of the upcoming election is an ordinance that, in addition to the standard classes of age, race, religion and gender, protects socioeconomic background, gender identity, gender expression and sexual orientation from discrimination in housing, employment and public accommodations.  Supporters say... [ MORE ]

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Arkansas voters will decide in a few weeks whether to increase the state's minimum wage. If you had to vote today, would you vote to raise minimum wage in Arkansas from $6.25 to $8.50 by 2017?

  • Yes. Anyone who works full-time should be able to support their family.
  • No. The government should not dictate how much workers are paid.
  • No. Minimum-wage jobs are for entry-level workers. If people want to get paid more, they should work their way up.
  • No. It will constrain employers and kill jobs.
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